Monthly Archives: March 2018

How to give your social media security a boost

Social media has become an important part of modern life for most people – one that can cause serious headaches if you’re sharing with a wider audience than you intend. Because functionality and settings change with surprising frequency, it’s a good idea to assess your account preferences regularly. But if you are not particularly security-savvy, it can be hard to know what specific things to look for. In this guide we’ll lay out a few things to consider.

While the most obvious place to start looking for security-related settings would be security or privacy tabs, you shouldn’t stop there. In my own searches, I was surprised how many security-related features were listed in totally different areas. When in doubt, click through all the various tabs available in the settings or preferences pages for your accounts, to see what is there. Here are a few things to keep an eye out for:

Login credentials

Different social media sites have a fairly wide variety of options available for preserving the security of your login credentials. At this point most social media sites offer some sort of two-factor authentication. They may also provide a list of devices already logged into your account that you can check for suspicious entries, and you can enable notifications for new logins. You should also check lists of apps approved to access your account, and remove those you no longer use.

Viewing content and posts

Another important item to check is who has permission to view your posts. There are certain aspects of your profile that cannot be made private – usually at least whatever is used as your avatar or profile picture, and some basic information such as a username – so choose these items with this in mind. Most sites will allow you to protect your posts, and some allow you to do so with varying levels of granularity. Even if you have set limited audiences for your posts, it’s still a good idea to post as if anything you say could be publicly exposed.

Contact info and location

Social media offers people all sorts of different ways to contact you. Aside from any direct messaging options, they may require you to input your email or phone numbers, and in some cases even your physical address, and those items may be searchable.Even if they do not ask you to type in your address, they may automatically add your GPS location unless you disable this functionality. You can usually limit the visibility of your contact methods, or restrict who can look you up if they already have access to your name, email address or phone number.

Sending messages and comments

Some sites allow you to limit who can message you or who can comment on your posts. You may either be able to do this by selecting or blocking groups, or by blocking specific people.

Photo and video tags

Where there are pictures and videos on social sites, you will inevitably find tagging. If you want to have the right to approve whether others can link your profile to photos, you will generally need to enable this option, as it is rarely (if ever) the default option.

Tracking and ads

Most websites – not just social networking sites – use some level of tracking in order to display personalized ads. Some social sites may allow you to adjust how or when you are tracked, or which ads are displayed.

Notifications

Receiving notifications from social sites can be sort of a mixed bag: they can let you know when something unexpected and unwanted is happening, or they can be a flood of potentially private information sent through an unencrypted channel where they can potentially be hijacked for nefarious purposes.

Curating your list of preferred types and methods of notification you receive can tip the scales in your favor. Facebook now allows you to use your PGP key to encrypt email notifications as well.

Autoplay

At best, content that runs automatically can occasionally be a nuisance. At worst, it can be a way for malicious content to execute before you know what hit you. Disabling “autoplay” functionality means you will need to click to run videos that people have posted, but it can also help you prevent a variety of rude surprises.

While the ever-changing functionality on social media sites can offer an exciting array of ways to connect with people, it can also be dizzying from a security perspective. By checking your settings with certain categories in mind, you can cut through the confusion and keep your account more secure.

Facebook was tracking your text message and phone call data. Now what?

While Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg was stumblingly apologizing for giving Russian-linked Cambridge Analytica access to over 50 million US Facebook users’ personal data, news broke that Facebook had been scraping call and text message data from Android phones for years.

If you looked closely, you would have seen Zuckerberg and company had been snooping on Facebook‘s billion-plus users since the beginning. Indeed, the company’s entire business model is built on profiting from your personal data.

That’s not news, but we’re only now realizing just how deeply Facebook data mines each of us including our phone call and text messaging records.

Tech site Ars Technica cited several users who discovered that if you used an Android phone and installed the Facebook app, the social network was likely logging your phone calls and text messages metadata ever since the Android app’s inception.

By metadata, that means Facebook was tracking when you called, how long you were on the call, and when you texted. Facebook never had access to the content. For example, Facebook could know you called your mom every Saturday evening, but not what you spoke about

It appears Facebook could never pull this off on Apple’s iOS. Other social networks, such as the obscure Path, pulled down its users’ contact information without permission. Path apologized for this and deleted the data. Even as Facebook apologizes for its privacy invasions, the social networking giant isn’t going that far.

On Android, the door was left open for Facebook to easily pull down your data via Android’s early application programming interface, or API. Before the launch of Android 6.0 in 2015, to use an app you had to agree to all its permission requirements. In Facebook’s case, the company asked for the moon — access to all your data including your phone usage.

With Android 6.0, Google introduced a permission model for Android app data access. Now when you install an application you must explicitly grant access to specific areas. You can also revoke these permissions.

It’s time to turn those off.

You may want to share your contacts with Facebook, but I’m hard pressed to think of a reason why you’d want Facebook to know about who and when you called or texted someone.

Anrdroid App Permissions
Don’t permit Facebook, or any other app, to access data it doesn’t need for its job.

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To do this, open your Settings app and tap “Apps.”

Then, click on each app. On the App info screen, you’ll see a “Permissions” category. From here, click on “Permissions”.

The next window lists all the permissions for the app. From the next “App permissions” screen, you can dive deeper into each app’s permissions — such as Camera, Contacts, Location, Microphone, Phone, SMS, and Storage — and change them.

Be aware, some apps won’t work without specific permissions. To stop Facebook snooping on your phone communications’ metadata, turn Phone and SMS off.

What’s that? You didn’t specifically grant Facebook the right to keep an eye on your phones and texts, so you’re good, right? Wrong.

Facebook apps kept using the older, but still supported pre-Android 4.1, software development kit (SDK) APIs’ permission rules for years. This gave Facebook access to your call and message logs by default.

Google finally deprecated the Android 4.0 API in October 2017. After that, Facebook no longer automatically pulled down your logs.

Whether you’re running an ancient phone with an old version of Android or a brand new Pixel 2 with Android 8.1, I’d double check Facebook and Facebook Messenger. It doesn’t hurt to be cautious.

Facebook says that it’s not the social network’s fault, it’s yours.

In a statement, Facebook stated: “Call and text history logging is part of an opt-in feature for people using Messenger or Facebook Lite on Android.”

While that may be true, it’s not all that obvious.

According to Facebook:

“When you sign up for Messenger or Facebook Lite on Android, or log into Messenger on an Android device, you are given the option to continuously upload your contacts as well as your call and text history. For Messenger, you can either turn it on, choose ‘learn more’ or ‘not now’. On Facebook Lite, the options are to turn it on or ‘skip’. If you chose to turn this feature on, we will begin to continuously log this information.”

Notice how they’re talking about contacts, but not explicitly about your calling and texting history. If you follow their links, you’re taken to a page that describes how to handle contacts for Messenger and the Facebook app. You must dive deeper still to find out how to turn off “Sync Your Call and Text History”. This can only be done from the app’s Permissions page.

To find out what Facebook has already collected from you, go to Facebook and create an archive. Take the following steps:

Go to the top right of any Facebook page and select “Settings”. Click “Download a copy of your Facebook data” at the bottom of general account settings. Then, click “Start My Archive”.

You’ll need to confirm you want to do this. In a few minutes you’ll get an email with a link to a zip file containing most of your Facebook information.

You’ll find the information on your calls and texts in the contact_info.htm file in the html directory. At the bottom of the files, after your contacts, you’ll see your call and message logs.

After you stop Facebook from gathering this information by either deleting the apps or changing their permissions, what will Facebook do with the data it already collected? Good question.

While Facebook claims, “You are always in control of the information you share with Facebook,” we know that’s not true, or it wouldn’t have been sharing our data with Cambridge Analytica. In this specific case, Facebook hasn’t said what it will do with the phone-related data.

While it is true that we installed the Facebook apps, 99 percent of us weren’t aware we were giving Facebook permission to riffle through our call and SMS logs. Mind you, some of us knew as far back as 2011 that Facebook was playing fast and loose with our contact information. But, seriously, how many people pay close attention to our application permissions? Perhaps a few more than those who actually read end-user licensing agreements (EULAs)?

Facebook declares it doesn’t collect the contents of calls or texts, and information collected isn’t sold to third parties. That’s not much solace to those whose data has been slurped up by the social networking giant.

Maybe Facebook won’t do anything questionable with your data, but, given what we know now about how Facebook handles our privacy, do you really want to take that chance?

Make Your Own WIFI HotSpot using Desktop/Laptop + Screenshots

Create Your Own WIFI HotSpot using Laptop or Desktop

You can now turn your Laptop or Desktop to a Wifi router and easily create unlimited hotspots! Share your existing wired/wireless internet connection to others by creating your own hotspot and assigning your own password to it. You can even ask them to pay if you want though. Here’s how you can do it.

Why Use a WIFI Hotspot?

There are various reasons why you should use a WIFI Hotspot and some of them are as follows:

  • Problem 1: You have your internet connection and want to share it with others that do not have. Then turn on your WIFI Hotspot.
  • Problem 2: You want to make money with your internet connection and want to create a WIFI Hotspot with a password of it in which users will pay first before they got access.

How to create a WIFI Hotspot using your Windows 10 Desktop or Laptop?

Follow the below instructions and be amazed at how easy they are to implement.

Method 1: Using the Feature of Windows 10 OS

Create a WIFI Hotspot on Windows 10

The easiest way to do this is by using Windows 10 since you do not need any third-party software to make your hotspot. However, you should install the latest updates of this version of Windows since this feature is added to it.

Step 1: Open the General Settings Windows

Press the Windows button on your keyboard and click on the Settings “Gear” icon.

Open Settings Windows

Step 2: Click on the Network & Internet Settings

You updated windows 10 should have this feature available and should be not an issue to find. If you cannot find this feature then please update your Windows 10.

Click on the Network and Internet

Step 3: You can now setup your Wifi Hotspot

Click on the Mobile Hotspot and Tick “On”. Edit your Wifi name and password. You are now ready to publicize your WIFI hotspot to others. Please note that you can only add up to 8 devices to your Wifi network.

Windows 10 Wifi Hotspot Settings

On this version of Windows, everything is very easy to implement. Should you find some problems with this tutorial please comment below.

Method 2: Using Commercial Software

Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 OS for this method.

On this method, we are going to use a commercial software in which has tons of feature if you want to get serious on commercializing your internet connection. Some of the important features of this software are that you can add a limitation on each device connected to your WIFI Hotspot. Like you can limit the time the device is connected or limit the bandwidth the device must use.

Create a WIFI Hotspot using Connectify Hotspot

Step 1: First download Connectify Hotspot 2017

Click on the “Buy Now” button if you want to buy the full version of the software or click on “Download” to instantly download the product and use the free version with the limitation of course. These limitations are, however, not that important since you can still use the full use of the software.

Download Connectify Hotspot 2017

Step 2: Install and Open Connectify Hotspot 2017

You may need to reboot your PC to successfully install the software. After the installation, you are now ready to use Connectify Hotspot 2017. Please note that we are using the free version of the software thus, we cannot edit the WIFI name. You can still edit the WIFI password though. After that, you are now ready to start your Hotspot connection.

Create a Wifi Hotspot using Connectify Hotspot 2017

Step 3: Check your Mobile for the Hotspot

To go your mobile WIFI tab and check for the WIFI network you have just enabled.

Check for Additional WIFI Connection

Reminders: Note that you can only use the Hotspot you have created with both method when your PC is turned on.

So that was both methods I have used and currently using the create a wifi hotspot on my home and to the public. Feel free to share your own method by commenting below.

Find, Lock and Erase All Data On Your Phone Without Touching It

Did you know that you can actually lock your android phone without physical contact? Yes! Lock your android phone remotely and easily.

Of course! You are devasted you lost your beloved phone because someone stole it or you lost it somewhere and someone found it but won’t return it to you and you were deeply worried because someone might actually be browsing your private data such as images, videos, and text messages. Well, worry no more because this tutorial will teach you to totally erased all the data you have on your lost phone and lock it for good!

Requirements:

These requirements are important to get everything done remotely. So, it’s important you set these up beforehand in case the time comes you lost your phone. And also, if you realized you lost your phone you should immediately perform these actions otherwise, you are giving the thief a handful of time to make something to your phone.

  • Phone Location must be turned on.
  • The phone itself must be turned on.
  • It must be signed to your Google Account.
  • It must have an internet connection.
  • The “Find my Device” Feature must be turned on.

Find Your Phone Remotely

You can easily find your phone EXACT location using this feature! Yes, the exact location simply follows the tutorial and requirements must be met first.

Tutorial:

  • To get everything started to go android.com/find
  • Sign in with your Google email the same that account was signed on your phone.
  • Give time to connect to your phone.
  • Then it will give you the real-time location of your phone! Yes, REAL-TIME.

How to Find Android Phone Remotely

Lock Your Phone Remotely

Now on locking your android device its just a few clicks away. Lock your phone and enter your phone number know the holder of your phone to contact you. Which is unlikely if your phone was stolen.

Tutorial:

  • Click the “Lock” Option and then enter a message and your phone number to get your contact.
  • Just like the image below.
  • On the right (phone’s end), this is what it will look like.

How to Lock Android Device Remotely

Erase Data On Your Phone Remotely

If every action you do fails. The thief won’t return your phone then this is your last resort. Erase all the data in it for GOOD! This will erase all your pictures, videos, contact list, messages and everything. The phone will be like the phone you have just bought it, empty on anything. And it will still remain locked after this.

Tutorial:

  • Go to Erase feature and then click on the erase.
  • Done!
  • This will erase everything you have on your phone.

How to Erase all Data on your Phone Remotely

Google put a lot of effort there to get everything is secured for you and your data. These features are all put together to protect your data but your phone can still be operational after everything. The thief can still do some magic on your phones program and reset everything bypassing every security feature and make the phone working again.

Discover Sub-Domains From SSL Certificates through – GetAltName

GetAltName it’s a little script to discover sub-domains that can extract Subject Alt Names for SSL Certificates directly from HTTPS websites which can provide you with DNS names or virtual servers.

GetAltName - Discover Sub-Domains From SSL Certificates

 

It’s useful in a discovery phase of a pen-testing assessment, this tool can provide you with more information about your target and scope.

Features of GetAltName to Discover Sub-Domains

  • Strips wildcards and www’s
  • Returns a unique list (no duplicates)
  • Works on verified and self-signed certs
  • Domain matching system
  • Filtering for main domains and TLDs
  • Gets additional sub-domains from crt.sh
  • Outputs to clipboard

GetAltName Subdomain Exctraction Tool Usage

You can output to a text file and also copy the output to your clipboard as a List or a Single line string, which is useful if you’re trying to make a quick scan with Nmap or other tools.

 

GetAltName Required

  • colorama
  • ndg-httpsclient
  • pyperclip
  • requests
  • tldextract

You can download GetAltName here:

getaltname-1.0.0.zip

Or read more here.

 

Share Your View Below In Comments For More Detail Implementations.

How to root Android phones or tablets (and unroot them) in 2018

Do you want unlimited control over your phone? Android rooting opens up a world of possibility, but it can also void your warranty, leave you with a broken smartphone, or worse. It isn’t for the faint of heart.

Manufacturers and carriers have a vested interest in dissuading you from rooting — if done incorrectly, it can irreparably damage your phone. Even so, the potential benefits are well worth it. With a rooted phone, you can remove bloatware, speed up your processor, and customize every element of your phone software’s appearance.

This guide on how to root Android devices will walk you through the necessary steps to root your phone. Some devices can be rooted in minutes. Others take a little research. But one thing is clear: Rooting your phone is one of the best ways to tap into your Android device’s true potential.

WHAT IS ROOTING?

Rooting an Android phone or tablet is akin to jailbreaking an iPhone — basically, it allows you to dive deeper into a phone’s sub-system. It will allow you to access the entirety of the operating system to customize just about anything on your Android device. With root access, you can also get around any restrictions that your manufacturer or carrier may have applied.

Rooting is best undertaken with caution. You will want to back up your phone’s software before you install — or “flash,” in rooting terms — a custom ROM (modified version of Android).

WHY WOULD YOU ROOT?

sony unlock how to root android

One of the biggest incentives to root your Android device is to rid yourself of bloatware that’s impossible to uninstall otherwise (although you can sometimes disable it . On some devices, rooting will enable previously disabled settings, like wireless tethering. Additional benefits include the ability to install specialized tools and flash custom ROMs, each of which can add extra features and improve your phone or tablet’s performance.

There’s no overabundance of must-have root apps, but there are enough to make it worthwhile. Some apps, for example, let you to automatically back up all of your apps and data to the cloud, block web and in-app advertisements, create secure tunnels to the internet, overclock your processor, and make your device a wireless hot spot.

WHY WOULDN’T YOU ROOT?

There are essentially four potential cons to rooting your Android.

  • Voiding your warranty: Some manufacturers or carriers will void your warranty if you root your device, so it is worth keeping in mind that you can always unroot. If you need to send the device back for repair, simply flash the software backup you made and it’ll be good as new.
  • Bricking your phone: If something goes wrong during the rooting process, you run the risk of bricking — i.e., corrupting — your device. The easiest way to prevent that from happening is to follow the instructions carefully. Make sure the guide you are following is up to date and that the custom ROM you flash is specifically for it. If you do your research, you won’t have to worry about bricking your smartphone.
  • Security risks: Rooting introduces some security risks. Depending on what services or apps you use on your device, it could create a security vulnerability. And certain malware takes advantage of rooted status to steal data, install additional malware, or target other devices with harmful web traffic.
  • Disabled apps: Some security-conscious apps and services do not work on rooted devices — financial platforms like Google’s Android Pay and Barclays Mobile Banking do not support them. Apps that serve copyrighted TV shows and movies, like Sky Go and Virgin TV Anywhere, will not start on rooted devices, either.

One of the easiest ways to root an Android device is by using an app, and a number of rooting apps have garnered attention over the years — KingRootFirmware.mobiKingo RootBaiduRoot, and One Click Root. They will root your device in the time it takes you to brush your teeth. But some only support devices running older versions of Android. If you’re looking to root an older device, you may need to check CFRoot’s older site.

While it used to be that rooting Android versions from Android 7.0 was more difficult — verified boot would check the device’s cryptographic integrity to detect if your device’s system files have been tampered with, and this would previously inhibit legitimate rooting apps. Thankfully, rooting apps have caught up with the curve, and rooting Android Nougat is much easier than it used to be. Kingo is one of the one-click apps that support Android 7.0 Nougat. Their list of supported manufacturers include:

If your phone isn’t compatible with a one-click rooting app, you will have to spend a little time researching alternatives on Android forums. The best place to start is XDA Developers Forum — look for a thread about your phone or tablet and you’re likely to find a method.

Preparation for root

Back up everything you cannot live without before you start. You should also always back up your phone’s current ROM before you flash a new one.

You will want to ensure that your device is fully charged before you begin.

You will need to turn on USB debugging, as well as OEM Unlocking.

Open Settings on your device. If you do not see Developer Options toward the bottom of the Settings screen, follow these steps to activate them.

  1. Tap on About Phone and find the Build Number.
  2. Tap on the Build Number seven times and the Developer Options will appear on the main page of the Settings.
  3. Tap on the Back key to see the Developer Options.
  4. Tap on Developer Options.
  5. Check to enable USB Debugging.
  6. Check to enable OEM Unlocking.

Installing the Android SDK tools

For the next step, you may have to install ADB and Fastboot on your computer.

  1. Click here to download and install the Android SDK Tools from Google’s developer site. There are choices for Windows, Mac, and Linux. These instructions are for Windows machines.
  2. When asked what directory to install the software to, we recommend that you set it to C:android-sdk. If you choose a different location, just make sure you remember it.
  3. Once the Android SDK Tools are installed, launch it from the Start Menu.
  4. The SDK Manager will open. Just uncheck everything except Android SDK Platform-tools. It’s at the top.
  5. Click on Install 2 packages at the bottom right.
  6. Check Accept license and click Install.

Installing device drivers

To ensure your computer can properly communicate with your smartphone or tablet, you will need to install the appropriate USB driver.

Here is a list of drivers from the most popular manufacturers:

Follow the installer’s instructions. Once the drivers is installed, proceed to the next step.

Unlock your bootloader

Before you get started, you’ll need to unlock your device’s bootloader. The bootloader, simply put, is the program that loads the device’s operating system. It determines which applications run during your phone or tablet’s startup process.

Some manufacturers require you to obtain a key in order to unlock the bootloader. MotorolaHTCLG, and Sony provide step-by-step instructions on how to do so, but a word of warning: They require you to register for a developer account.

Once you have taken those steps, you can embark on the unlocking process. You will need to put your device in fastboot mode. It’s different for every phone, but on most devices, rebooting the device and holding down the Power and Volume Down buttons for ten seconds does the trick (HTC phones require that you hit the Volume Down key and press the Power button to select it.)

Once you have booted into fastboot, open your computer’s command prompt by holding down Shift+Right Click and choosing “Open a Command Prompt Here.” If your device requires a code, you will get a long string of characters. Paste it into the box on your device manufacturer’s website, submit the form, and await an email with a key, file, and further instructions.

To unlock your device’s bootloader, connect it to your computer and place it in fastboot mode again. Pull up the command prompt.

For Google Nexus and Pixel devices, the commands are easy:

  • Nexus phones: Type “fastboot oem unlock” (without quotes) and hit enter
  • Pixel phones: Type “fastboot flashing unlock” (without quotes) and hit enter

Motorola’s command is a little different:

  • Type “oem unlock UNIQUE_KEY” (without quotes), replacing “UNIQUE KEY” with the code you received

So is HTC’s:

  • Type “unlocktoken Unlock_code.bin” (without quotes), replacing “Unlock_code.bin” with the file you received.

Confirm the unlock, and you’re one step closer to rooting your Android device.

Some manufacturers and carriers don’t sanction bootloader unlocking, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. Try searching the the XDA Developers forum for workarounds and unofficial solutions.

Beware – Memcached DDoS Attacks Will Be BIG In 2018

So after the massive DDoS attack trend in 2016 it seems like 2018 is going to the year of the Memcached DDoS amplification attack with so many insecure Memcached servers available on the public Internet.

Memcached DDoS Attacks Will Be BIG In 2018

 

Unfortunately, it looks like a problem that won’t easily go away as there are so many publically exposed, poorly configured Memcached servers online (estimated to be over 100,000).

Honestly, Github handled the 1.3Tbps attack like a champ with only 10 minutes downtime although they did deflect it by moving traffic to Akamai.

Last week, the code repository GitHub was taken off air in a 1.3Tbps denial of service attack. We predicted then that there would be more such attacks and it seems we were right.

Arbor Networks is now reporting that a US service provider suffered a 1.7Tbps attack earlier this month. In this case, there were no outages as the provider had taken adequate safeguards, but it’s clear that the memcached attack is going to be a feature network managers are going to have to take seriously in the future.

The attacks use shoddily secured memcached database servers to amplify attacks against a target. The assailant spoofs the UDP address of its victim and pings a small data packet at a memcached server that doesn’t have an authenticated traffic requirement in place. The server responds by firing back as much as 50,000 times the data it received.

 

Then less than a week later, there appears to have been another record-breaking Memcached DDoS attack this time clocking in at 1.7Tbps, although we don’t currently know who it was aimed at.

The amplification is fairly significant as well with the Memcached servers sending up to 50,000 times the data recieved to the unwitting victim, I imagine they are sending some kind of command to retrieve all key value pairs available on the server to the spoofed IP – which could be a significant amount of traffic.

With multiple data packets sent out a second, the memcached server unwittingly amplifies the deluge of data that can be sent against the target. Without proper filtering and network management, the tsunami of data can be enough to knock some providers offline.

There are some simple mitigation techniques, notably blocking off UDP traffic from Port 11211, which is the default avenue for traffic from memcached servers. In addition, the operators of memcached servers need to lock down their systems to avoid taking part in such denial of service attacks.

“While the internet community is coming together to shut down access to the many open memcached servers out there, the sheer number of servers running memcached openly will make this a lasting vulnerability that attackers will exploit,” said Carlos Morales, VP of sales, engineering and operations at Arbor Networks.

“It is critically important for companies to take the necessary steps to protect themselves.”

Memcached servers, like any other part of a well-built infrastructure, should be only listening on the LAN IP address, not the public IP (like any database), but like the whole MongoDB Ransack fiasco, it’s much easier to listen on * and Memcached typically is used without any type of authentication.

I suspect we will see many more of these Memcached DDoS attacks through-out 2018, and probably more targeted. I’m not sure why people love to target Github – perhaps because it’s just so resilient it’s a good test target to see how effective you are.

Source: The Register

How to Track Facebook Profile Visitors 2018 ?

Track Facebook Profile Visitors – Here We Have something Amazing that Now  You are Able to Track Facebook Profile Visitors without any software Easily by a Simple Facebook Trick. There is not a Facebook Feature and Offered by Facebook. You can Get and all the List of the Facebook Profiles who visit on your Facebook profile. On Facebook, Every User wants to See that Who is Secretly view their Profile. So, That why we share this Crazy Facebook Tricks to Track Profile Visitor.

On the Internet, People are also searching for “fb profile visitor app” or “facebook visitor tracker free download” terms like that but according to me there is no such facebook profile tracker app for android so searching on google about this is just a waste of time. You can track facebook profile visitor or check who is viewed your facebook profile by the following trick. this is for people who search on google about “facebook track who views your profile” so that’s why I am compiling here some great tips and tricks on facebook. People who search for track facebook profile ip you can check this link out and know how you do you know that from which IP your facebook profile is used.

How to Track Facebook Profile Visitors ?
How to Track Facebook Profile Visitors?

Now, Today We are Going to show a Facebook Trick to Track Facebook Profile Visitors. This is not Officially Permitted by Facebook but many of Geeks or Computer Worms find a Way to Track your Profile Visitors in Facebook Page View Source. Facebook has not Added this Cool Feature because they do not want to Reveal Information about Profile Visitors. Now on the Internet, this is the very Popular trick to Track your Facebook Profile Visitor. People want to Know who is Open Their Profiles and See their Pictures and Status. It is very Cool Trick that You can Now find who is Visit on your Facebook Profile.

 

How to Track Facebook Profile Visitors?

  1. Log in your Facebook Account.
  2. By Default you are on Facebook Home Page But If you are not Go to Facebook Home.
  3. Press CTRL+U and a New Window Open Where you see the Source Code of Facebook Page or You can also Do it By Right Click >> Open Source Code.
  4. Now Press CTRL+F and Search for this InitialChatFriendsList and You will see that Many Profile ID’s starting with 1000 is the Facebook Profile ids. You can Pick up any ID to see who is visit your Profile. In Below Picture You see that there are many People who View Facebook Profiles Secretly.These are the Facebook Profile IDs that Visit on your Profile
  5. Use These Profile ID’s like www.facebook.com/ID and Paste in Browser URL and See People who Watching you.
  6. These all are Facebook Profile IDs who is Visiting your Facebook Profile.
  7. Now you need to Pick Each of Profile Code and use this Process Again and Again. This is Little Complicated but 100% Working Trick.

This is Very Easy Trick to Track Facebook Profile Visitor and See Who is Watching you in Their Free Time and It may be your Lover, Hater, Relative or a Friend. Hackers are also View your Facebook Profile first before to perform an attack on your Facebook Account. They Target Facebook to get all User Information about Hobbies, Friends, and Relatives, Date of Birth. In Other Word, they use Brute Force to get Access your Facebook Account.

 

So Beware Before Updating Your Info On Facebook. If You have any questions you can comment below

Pros and cons of using a VPN

Pros and cons of using a VPN

The benefit of using a secure VPN is it ensures the appropriate level of security to the connected systems when the underlying network infrastructure alone cannot provide it. The justification for using VPN access instead of a private network usually boils down to cost and feasibility: It is either not feasible to have a private network — e.g., for a traveling sales rep — or it is too costly to do so.

VPN performance can be affected by a variety of factors, among them the speed of users’ internet connections, the types of protocols an internet service provider may use and the type of encryption the VPN uses. Performance can also be affected by poor quality of service and conditions that are outside the control of IT.

 

VPN protocols

There are several different protocols used to secure and encrypt users and corporate data:

IP security (IPsec)
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS)
Point-To-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP)
Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP)
OpenVPN

 

The most common types of VPNs are remote-access VPNs and site-to-site VPNs.

Remote-access VPN

A remote-access VPN uses a public telecommunication infrastructure like the internet to provide remote users secure access to their organization’s network. This is especially important when employees are using a public Wi-Fi hotspot or other avenues to use the internet and connect into their corporate network. A VPN client on the remote user’s computer or mobile device connects to a VPN gateway on the organization’s network. The gateway typically requires the device to authenticate its identity. Then, it creates a network link back to the device that allows it to reach internal network resources — e.g., file servers, printers and intranets — as though it was on that network locally.

A remote-access VPN usually relies on either IPsec or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to secure the connection, although SSL VPNs are often focused on supplying secure access to a single application, rather than to the entire internal network. Some VPNs provide Layer 2 access to the target network; these require a tunneling protocol like PPTP or L2TP running across the base IPsec connection.

VPN design, What is VPN

Site-to-site VPN

A site-to-site VPN uses a gateway device to connect the entire network in one location to the network in another — usually a small branch connecting to a data center. End-node devices in the remote location do not need VPN clients because the gateway handles the connection. Most site-to-site VPNs connecting over the internet use IPsec. It is also common to use carrier MPLS clouds, rather than the public internet, as the transport for site-to-site VPNs. Here, too, it is possible to have either Layer 3 connectivity (MPLS IP VPN) or Layer 2 (Virtual Private LAN Service, or VPLS) running across the base transport.

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